Josef Filipowicz

Josef Filipowicz is a local government and housing policy specialist with the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation. He holds an M.A. in Political Science from Wilfrid Laurier University and a Bachelor of Urban and Regional Planning from Ryerson University. From September 2014 to April 2020, Mr. Filipowicz was a policy analyst at the Fraser Institute’s Centre for Municipal Studies, where he was the author of more than 15 studies on land-use regulations, housing affordability, property taxation, and municipal finance. He also commented frequently on policy issues in these fields, notably through radio and television interviews, panel discussions, public presentations, and more than 140 blogs and op-eds. His work has been featured in numerous news outlets including the Wall Street Journal, Globe and Mail, Toronto Star, Maclean’s, Detroit News, and Financial Post.

Recent Research by Josef Filipowicz

— Oct 8, 2020
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Job Creation and Housing Starts in Canada’s Largest Metropolitan Areas

Job Creation and Housing Starts in Canada’s Largest Metropolitan Areas is a new study that finds the Vancouver and Toronto areas—while accounting for less than 25 per cent of Canada’s population, accounted for 120,000 new jobs from 2015 to 2019. But over the same period, the number of new housing starts in the two regions remained largely stagnant at approximately 57,000 a year—a rate that has largely been unchanged since 2002.

— Jul 23, 2020
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Changes in the Affordability of Housing in Canadian and American Cities, 2006–2016 is a new study that measures changes in housing affordability—shelter costs as a share of income—over a 10-year period in 396 cities in Canada and the United States. Crucially, while affordability increased by an average of 10.5 per cent for the 344 American metropolitan areas included in the analysis, housing affordability actually decreased by 7.6 per cent, on average, in the 52 Canadian metropolitan areas over the same 10-year period. Put differently, while the majority of U.S. cities included in the analysis simultaneously experienced population and income growth and increasing housing affordability, Canada’s largest cities—while experiencing similar population and income growth—became less affordable to live in.

— Oct 17, 2019
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Who Bears the Burden of Property Taxes in Canada’s Largest Metropolitan Areas?

Who Bears the Burden of Property Taxes in Canada’s Largest Metropolitan Areas? analyzes the ratio of municipal and provincial property tax rates (including education) paid by residents, businesses and industries in Canada’s major urban areas. It finds that across the country, but particularly in the cities of Toronto, Montreal, Calgary, Edmonton and Vancouver, businesses pay much higher property tax rates than residents, which can erode competitiveness and lead to business migration, reduced hiring and investment, and even business closures.