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Reforming BC Auto Insurance to Benefit Consumers

Reforming BC Auto Insurance to Benefit Consumers finds that the Government of British Columbia’s ICBC reforms haven’t gone far enough and maintain ICBC’s monopoly on basic automobile insurance—which keeps rates higher than they would be in a more open insurance market.

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Financing the Canada Child Benefit

Financing the Canada Child Benefit, part two of an essay series on the Canada Child Benefit (CCB), finds that federal spending on benefits for eligible families with children through the CCB increased by 68.5 per cent from fiscal year 2014/15 to 2019/20—financed entirely by borrowing.

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Report Card on Quebec's Secondary Schools 2020

The Report Card on Quebec’s Secondary Schools 2020 ranks 473 public, independent, Francophone and Anglophone schools based largely on the results from provincewide tests in French, English, science and mathematics. The Report Card provides parents and educators with objective information that’s difficult to find anywhere else, which is why it’s the go-to source for school performance in Quebec.

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Achieving the Four-Day Work Week

Two new essays—Putting Government on a Financial Diet: The Role of Statutory Fiscal Rules by Jack Mintz, president’s fellow at the University of Calgary, and Government Size and Economic Growth: An Overview by Livio Di Matteo, professor of economics at Lakehead University and a senior fellow at the Fraser Institute—note that the federal government’s budget deficit and mounting debt, and the overall size of government in Canada, will discourage economic productivity and the possibility of a four-day work week.

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Carbon Pricing in High-Income OECD Countries

Carbon Pricing in High-Income OECD Countries is a new study that finds of the 14 countries in the OECD that have implemented a carbon tax, all have failed with respect to key design aspects of a well-functioning carbon tax, such as using carbon tax revenue to reduce more economically harmful taxes like personal income taxes, removing other emission-related regulations, and ending government subsidies to alternative energy sources.

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Does Canada Need a Wealth Tax?

Does Canada Need a Wealth Tax? is a new study that finds not only will implementing a wealth tax reduce Canada’s economic growth and recovery post-COVID, but that it is unnecessary as the wealth inequality gap is shrinking in Canada. A wealth tax in Canada would constrain economic growth by discouraging savings and investment, especially when wealth taxes are layered on top of existing taxes.

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Job Creation and Housing Starts in Canada’s Largest Metropolitan Areas

Job Creation and Housing Starts in Canada’s Largest Metropolitan Areas is a new study that finds the Vancouver and Toronto areas—while accounting for less than 25 per cent of Canada’s population, accounted for 120,000 new jobs from 2015 to 2019. But over the same period, the number of new housing starts in the two regions remained largely stagnant at approximately 57,000 a year—a rate that has largely been unchanged since 2002.