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Steve Lafleur

Senior Policy Analyst, Fraser Institute

Steve Lafleur is Senior Policy Analyst at the Fraser Institute. He holds an M.A. in Political Science from Wilfrid Laurier University and a B.A. from Laurentian University where he studied Political Science and Economics. He was previously a Senior Policy Analyst with the Frontier Centre for Public Policy in Winnipeg, and is a Contributing Editor to New Geography. His past work has focused primarily on housing, transportation, local government and inter-governmental fiscal relations. His current focus is on economic competitiveness of jurisdictions in the Prairie provinces.  His writing has appeared in every major national and regional Canadian newspaper and his work has been cited by many sources including the Partnership for a New American Economy and the Reason Foundation.

Recent Research by Steve Lafleur

— Feb 25, 2021
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Federal and Provincial Debt-Interest Costs for Canadians

Federal and Provincial Debt-Interest Costs for Canadians is a new study that finds taxpayers across Canada will pay a total of $49.6 billion—or about $4 billion a month—in interest payments for the federal and provincial debts this year alone. Even provinces that recently had low interest costs, such as Alberta, have lost this advantage due to years of mounting debt and deficits.

— Feb 2, 2021
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The Growing Debt Burden for Canadians: 2021 Edition

The Growing Debt Burden for Canadians: 2021 Edition is a new study that finds combined federal and provincial government debt in Canada has doubled from $1.0 trillion in 2007/08 to a projected $2.0 trillion this year. And the combined debt now equals 91.6 per cent of the Canadian economy—up from 65.2 per cent last year.

— Oct 8, 2020
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Job Creation and Housing Starts in Canada’s Largest Metropolitan Areas

Job Creation and Housing Starts in Canada’s Largest Metropolitan Areas is a new study that finds the Vancouver and Toronto areas—while accounting for less than 25 per cent of Canada’s population, accounted for 120,000 new jobs from 2015 to 2019. But over the same period, the number of new housing starts in the two regions remained largely stagnant at approximately 57,000 a year—a rate that has largely been unchanged since 2002.