Jairo Yunis

Junior Policy Analyst, Fraser Institute

Jairo Yunis is a Policy Analyst at the Fraser Institute. He holds a Bachelor of Political Science and International Relations from the Pontifical Xaverian University of Colombia and a Master’s degree in Public Policy from the University of Calgary. Jairo has previously worked for government in Colombia in policy issues related to local economic development and competitiveness. He specializes in energy policy, with a focus on carbon pricing and electricity markets.

Recent Research by Jairo Yunis

— Jan 14, 2021
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Canada-US Energy Sector Competitiveness Survey 2020

The Canada-US Energy Sector Competitiveness Survey finds that Oklahoma and Texas are considered far more attractive than Alberta for oil and gas investment. Specifically, investors pointed to the uncertainty concerning environmental regulations, the cost of regulatory compliance, and regulatory enforcement as major areas of concern in Canadian provinces compared to US states. The study also ranks 21 North American jurisdictions based on policies affecting oil and gas investment, and Saskatchewan (8th) was the only Canadian province to make the top ten. Oklahoma ranked 1st, Kansas ranked 2nd, and Texas ranked 3rd, while Alberta ranked 12th and British Columbia was 20th out of 21.

— Oct 20, 2020
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Carbon Pricing in High-Income OECD Countries

Carbon Pricing in High-Income OECD Countries is a new study that finds of the 14 countries in the OECD that have implemented a carbon tax, all have failed with respect to key design aspects of a well-functioning carbon tax, such as using carbon tax revenue to reduce more economically harmful taxes like personal income taxes, removing other emission-related regulations, and ending government subsidies to alternative energy sources.

— Jul 21, 2020
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Stimulating Economic Growth through Abundant Energy

Stimulating Economic Growth Through Abundant Energy finds that access to affordable, abundant energy promotes economic growth and could help Canada recover from the COVID recession. In particular, a ten per cent increase in energy use is associated with a 1.16 per cent increase in GDP. Critically, Canada’s economic growth over the past decade was already weaker than several other developed countries including the United States, Germany, Japan, and the whole G7 group of economies, on average.