Provincial Prosperity

— Sep 28, 2021
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An Assessment of Recent Economic Performance and Business Investment Growth in Ontario

An Assessment of Recent Economic Performance and Business Investment Growth in Ontario finds that the average rate of economic growth from 2000 to 2019 (excluding 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic) was weaker in Ontario than it was in the other large Canadian provinces. In fact, Ontario’s rate of business investment growth over the same period was the third lowest in Canada ahead of just New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.

— Aug 19, 2021
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Repairing Alberta's Heritage Fund for the Long Term

Repairing Alberta's Heritage Fund for the Long Term finds that the Alberta government can learn from Alaska and introduce better rules for the province’s Heritage Fund, which would include inflation-proofing the fund and paying dividends to Alberta residents.

— Jul 20, 2021
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What Happens If Alberta Returns to the Flat Tax System?

What Happens If Alberta Returns to the Flat Tax System? find that the Alberta government can reinstate a 10 per cent single-rate personal income tax and restore the “Alberta Tax Advantage” while incurring only a modest loss in revenue.

— Jun 15, 2021
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A New (Old) Fiscal Rule for Non-Renewable Resource Revenue in Alberta

A New (Old) Fiscal Rule for Non-Renewable Resource Revenue in Alberta is a new study that examines how Alberta’s budget deficits and mounting debt are due in part to its treatment of non-renewable resource revenue in the budget. The study recommends reinstating fiscal rules that require a certain amount of resource revenues be saved in order to stabilize provincial finances.

— Jun 8, 2021
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Ford Government Fiscal Policy Approach Mirrors that of McGuinty and Wynne

Ford Government Fiscal Policy Approach Mirrors that of McGuinty and Wynne finds that the current Ontario government is continuing the fiscal approach of the previous Wynne and McGuinty governments, excluding emergency COVID spending. In fact, according to 2021 budget forecasts, over the next three years government spending (minus interest costs) will increase by a cumulative total of 8.5 per cent compared to 6.6 per cent from 2010 to 2012.

— Apr 27, 2021
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Measuring Ontario’s Regional Prosperity Gap

Measuring Ontario’s Regional Prosperity Gap is a new study that compares average incomes in Ontario, Quebec and eight American states in the Great Lakes region. It finds that in 2019, Ontario’s GDP per person trailed neighbouring Michigan by nearly $4,000, and in fact, Ontario lags the regional average GDP per person by $16,607, or 27.1 per cent.

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