Provincial Prosperity

— Jan 31, 2023
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Measuring British Columbia’s Prosperity Gap

Measuring British Columbia’s Prosperity Gap finds that, among eight peer jurisdictions (including Alberta and Washington State), B.C. in 2019 had the lowest median employment income, a key indicator of economic well-being.

— Jan 24, 2023
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Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Ontario, 2023 Edition

Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Ontario, 2023 Edition finds that the wages of government employees in Ontario are 34.4 per cent higher, on average, than wages in the private sector in 2021, the most recent year of available comparable data from Statistics Canada’s Labour Force Survey.

— Jan 24, 2023
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Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Quebec, 2023 Edition

Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Quebec, 2023 Edition finds that the wages of government employees in Quebec are 32.2 per cent higher, on average, than wages in the private sector in 2021, the most recent year of available comparable data from Statistics Canada’s Labour Force Survey.

— Jan 5, 2023
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Broken Promises: The Persistence of Elevated Personal and Corporate Income Taxes in Ontario

Broken Promises: The persistence of elevated personal and corporate income taxes in Ontario is a new study that finds due to both federal and provincial tax hikes, Ontario now has the third highest top combined federal/provincial or federal/ state top income tax rate in Canada or the United States—having jumped from 46.41 per cent in 2012 to 53.53 per cent.

— Jan 4, 2023
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The End of Spending Restraint in British Columbia

The End of Spending Restraint in British Columbia finds that after a long period of relative spending restraint, the B.C. government significantly increased spending—even before any COVID-related spending began.

— Nov 8, 2022
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Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Alberta, 2021

Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Alberta, 2021 is a new study that finds even after adjusting for differences such as age, gender, education, tenure, type of work, industry, and occupation, government employees are still paid 5.6 per cent higher wages on average in Alberta compared to their private sector counterparts, in addition to many non-wage benefits such as Registered Pension Plans, personal leave, and early retirement.

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