Alberta Prosperity

— Nov 8, 2022
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Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Alberta, 2021

Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Alberta, 2021 is a new study that finds even after adjusting for differences such as age, gender, education, tenure, type of work, industry, and occupation, government employees are still paid 5.6 per cent higher wages on average in Alberta compared to their private sector counterparts, in addition to many non-wage benefits such as Registered Pension Plans, personal leave, and early retirement.

— Aug 3, 2022
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Alberta Premiers and Government Spending

Alberta Premiers and Government Spending finds that from 1965 to 2020, the highest level of per-person provincial government spending (adjusted for inflation) in Alberta occurred in 2017—three years before the pandemic.

— May 12, 2022
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What Changed in Alberta from the Fall 2021 Mid-year Update to Budget 2022

What Changed in Alberta from the Fall 2021 Mid-year Update to Budget 2022 is a new study that finds following a windfall in resource revenue, the recent Alberta budget increased program spending by $4 billion over the next three years. This increase in spending is above and beyond what would be required to keep pace with inflation and population growth.

— Mar 10, 2022
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Four Myths about Economic Diversification in Alberta

Four Myths about economic diversification in Alberta is a new study that finds despite misperceptions, oil and gas production in the province does not dominate economic activity or employment in Alberta to the point that the provincial economy is notably less diversified than other provinces. In fact, with respect to employment, Alberta’s was the most diversified provincial economy in Canada in 2020.

— Feb 3, 2022
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A New Fiscal Framework for Alberta

A New Fiscal Framework for Alberta is a new study that finds rather than use precarious resource revenue to support high spending in Alberta, the Alberta Sustainability Fund (ASF) should be reintroduced and have contributions to the Heritage fund renewed to ensure long-term financial stability in the province.

— Nov 30, 2021
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The Implications of an Aging Population for Government Finances in Alberta

The Implications of an Aging Population for Government Finances in Alberta is a new study that finds health-care expenditures in the province will increase by an estimated 5.6 per cent annually (on average) over the next 20 years, and as a result of Alberta’s changing demographics, the province may not balance its budget until at least 2040/41 unless it makes changes to its spending.

Alberta Prosperity Research Experts