Alberta Prosperity

— Nov 30, 2021
Printer-friendly version
The Implications of an Aging Population for Government Finances in Alberta

The Implications of an Aging Population for Government Finances in Alberta is a new study that finds health-care expenditures in the province will increase by an estimated 5.6 per cent annually (on average) over the next 20 years, and as a result of Alberta’s changing demographics, the province may not balance its budget until at least 2040/41 unless it makes changes to its spending.

— Aug 19, 2021
Printer-friendly version
Repairing Alberta's Heritage Fund for the Long Term

Repairing Alberta's Heritage Fund for the Long Term finds that the Alberta government can learn from Alaska and introduce better rules for the province’s Heritage Fund, which would include inflation-proofing the fund and paying dividends to Alberta residents.

— Jul 20, 2021
Printer-friendly version
What Happens If Alberta Returns to the Flat Tax System?

What Happens If Alberta Returns to the Flat Tax System? find that the Alberta government can reinstate a 10 per cent single-rate personal income tax and restore the “Alberta Tax Advantage” while incurring only a modest loss in revenue.

— Jun 15, 2021
Printer-friendly version
A New (Old) Fiscal Rule for Non-Renewable Resource Revenue in Alberta

A New (Old) Fiscal Rule for Non-Renewable Resource Revenue in Alberta is a new study that examines how Alberta’s budget deficits and mounting debt are due in part to its treatment of non-renewable resource revenue in the budget. The study recommends reinstating fiscal rules that require a certain amount of resource revenues be saved in order to stabilize provincial finances.

— Feb 9, 2021
Printer-friendly version
Lessons for Fiscal Reform from the Klein Era

Lessons for Fiscal Reform from the Klein Era finds that today's Alberta government can learn some key lessons from the Klein reforms of the 1990s, which helped quickly eliminate the province's budget deficit and lay the foundation for more than a decade of surpluses.

— Dec 3, 2020
Printer-friendly version
The Great Convergence: Measuring the Fiscal Gap Between “Have” and “Have-Not” Provinces

The Great Convergence: Measuring the Fiscal Capacity Gap Between “Have” and “Have-Not” Provinces is a new study that finds the gap between the ability of Canada’s richer and poorer provinces to raise revenues is shrinking rapidly. If Alberta’s fiscal capacity gap continues to shrink relative to the rest of Canada, the province could soon become eligible for equalization transfers, which would affect transfers to other so-called “have not” provinces.

Alberta Prosperity Research Experts