Ben Eisen

Senior Fellow, Fraser Institute

Ben Eisen is a Senior Fellow in Fiscal and Provincial Prosperity Studies and former Director of Provincial Prosperity Studies at the Fraser Institute. He holds a BA from the University of Toronto and an MPP from the University of Toronto’s School of Public Policy and Governance. Prior to joining the Fraser Institute Mr. Eisen was the Director of Research and Programmes at the Atlantic Institute for Market Studies in Halifax.  He also worked for the Citizens Budget Commission in New York City, and in Winnipeg as the Assistant Research Director for the Frontier Centre for Public Policy. Mr. Eisen has published influential studies on several policy topics, including intergovernmental relations, public finance, and higher education policy. He has been widely quoted in major newspapers including the National Post, Chronicle Herald, Winnipeg Free Press and Calgary Herald.

Recent Research by Ben Eisen

— Aug 4, 2022
Printer-friendly version
Ford Government Plans to Outspend Wynne Government

Ford Government Plans to Outspend Wynne Government finds that, despite any rhetoric to the contrary, the current Ontario government plans to outspend its predecessor.

— May 26, 2022
Printer-friendly version
Understanding the Changing Ratio of Working-Age Canadians to Seniors and Its Consequences

Understanding the Changing Ratio of Working-Age Canadians to Seniors and Its Consequences is a new study that finds as Canada’s population ages, the number of working-aged Canadians relative to the number of seniors has declined from 5.4 in 2000 to 3.4 in 2022, which means government spending related to seniors is increasing at the same time that the growth in tax revenues is declining.

— Apr 6, 2022
Printer-friendly version
No Free Lunch for the 99 Percent: Estimating Revenue Effects from Taxes on Top Earners

No Free Lunch for the 99 Percent: Estimating Revenue Effects from Taxes on Top Earners finds that if the federal government, which plans to table its next budget this week, wants to fund a major expansion of government, it simply can’t raise enough tax revenue solely from Canada’s upper-income families.