Joel Emes

Senior Economist, Fraser Institute

Joel Emes is a Senior Economist, Addington Centre for Measurement, at the Fraser Institute. Joel started his career with the Fraser Institute and rejoined after a stint as a senior analyst, acting executive director and then senior advisor to British Columbia’s provincial government. Joel initiated and led several flagship projects in the areas of tax freedom and government performance, spending, debt, and unfunded liabilities. He supports many projects at the Institute in areas such as investment, equalization, school performance and fiscal policy. Joel holds a B.A. and an M.A. in economics from Simon Fraser University.

Recent Research by Joel Emes

— Nov 3, 2022
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Comparing the Economies of Atlantic Canada and New England

Comparing the Economies of Atlantic Canada and New England finds that, despite many similarities between the two regions, the median employment earnings in New England was $44,236 compared to $29,150 in Atlantic Canada—a difference of $15,086

— Sep 27, 2022
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Report Card on British Columbia's Elementary Schools 2021

The Report Card on British Columbia’s Elementary Schools 2021, which ranks 927 public and independent elementary schools based on 10 academic indicators derived from the provincewide Foundation Skills Assessment (FSA), suggests that every school is capable of improvement regardless of type, location and student characteristics.

— Aug 25, 2022
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Comparing per-Person Spending and Revenue in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area, 2009–2019

Comparing per-Person Spending and Revenue in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area, 2009–2019 is a new study that finds across the 26 municipalities that constitute the GTHA, per person spending (adjusted for inflation) increased by 9.6 per cent between 2009 and 2019, and Toronto remained the highest spending municipality in 2019. Not surprisingly, there is a connection between high spending municipalities and high tax municipalities, as Toronto, the highest spending municipality was also the 3rd highest taxing municipality (total per person revenues adjusted for inflation) in 2019.