Laura Jones

Executive Vice-President, Canadian Federation of Independent Business

Laura Jones is Chief Strategic Officer and Executive Vice-President of the Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB), a non-profit association that advocates for 110,000 independent businesses across Canada. She is responsible for CFIB’s legislative, communications, research, and marketing functions.

Since joining CFIB in 2003, Ms. Jones has spearheaded several high-profile campaigns on behalf of small businesses, including creating CFIB’s annual Red Tape Awareness WeekTM and Small Business Every Day Campaign. She has authored a number studies on regulation, including papers for the Organisation of Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), the Mercatus Centre, and CFIB.

Ms. Jones has been providing advice to Canadian governments on effective regulatory reform for more than a decade served on several federal and provincial regulatory committees. Currently, she serves as Chair of the federal External Advisory Committee on Regulatory Competitiveness. She is currently on the board of the Macdonald-Laurier Institute and CFIB.

Ms. Jones received her B.A. in Economics from Mount Holyoke College in Massachusetts, and her M.A. in Economics from Simon Fraser University. She and her husband live in Vancouver with their three spirited children.

Recent Research by Laura Jones

— Jan 12, 2021
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Achieving the Four-Day Work Week: Part 3 Essays

Two new essays—The Drag on Productivity from Excessive Regulation, by researcher Laura Jones, chief strategic officer and executive vice-president of the Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB), and The Importance of Labour Market Mobility to Productivity Growth by Fraser Institute senior fellow Robert P. Murphy—argues that governments could increase worker productivity and wages by eliminating undue labour market restrictions.

— Dec 8, 2003
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Headlines about fisheries fiascos in Canada are nothing new: economic and conservation woes plague the historically most important fisheries, salmon on the west coast and cod on the east coast. What have not made the headlines however, are management changes that have saved many of Canada's smaller fisheries such as halibut, sablefish, and sea cucumber.

— Apr 18, 2002
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The index of environmental indicators for Canada, the United States, Mexico, the United Kingdom, and South Korea shows that fears about increasing environmental degradation in these countries are unfounded. Environmental quality is getting better, not worse.