Government Spending

— Sep 9, 2021
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The Lifetime Tax Burden for Canadians from Federal Debt Accumulation

Lifetime Tax Burden for Canadians from Federal Debt Accumulation finds that Canadians aged 16 to 35 will pay an additional $205.1 billion in personal income taxes (or 61.7 per cent of the total burden imposed on all age groups) over their lifetimes due to additional federal debt accumulation.

— Aug 26, 2021
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Education Spending in Public Schools in Canada, Fall 2021

Education Spending in Public Schools in Canada, Fall 2021 finds from 2014/15 to 2018/19 per-student education spending increased across Canada, with compensation (salaries, benefits and pensions) accounting for most of the growth in spending.

— Aug 10, 2021
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An International Comparison of Capital Expenditures

An International Comparison of Capital Expenditures is a new study that finds the growth rate of overall capital expenditures in Canada slowed substantially from 2005 to 2019. Critically, from 2015 to 2019, the growth rate was lower than in virtually any other period since 1970, with corporate investment dropping below other developed countries such as the United States, Sweden, France, Norway, and Australia.

— Jul 29, 2021
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Industry-Level Private Sector Capital Expenditures in Canada: 1990-2019

Industry-Level Private Sector Capital Expenditures in Canada: 1990-2019 examines how, despite the absence of a major recession (as Canada experienced in the early 1990s and 2008-09), more domestic industries experienced decreases in capital investment from 2015 to 2019 than at any other time since 1990. Critically, a majority of industries decreased investment in machinery, equipment and intellectual property products (such as software), which all significantly impact productivity.

— Jun 29, 2021
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Interest Cost Risks to Government Budgets

Interest Cost Risks to Government Budgets is a new study that examines what would happen to government interest costs (essentially the interest paid on outstanding debt) and government budgets if interest costs returned to the near-historically low levels of 2019-20. Crucially, government interest costs could increase to $35.2 billion in 2021-22, a rise of $13.1 billion from the current projection based on the latest government budgets.

— Jun 10, 2021
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Understanding Universal Health Care Reform Options: Activity-Based Funding

Understanding Universal Health Care Reform Options: Activity-Based Funding is a new study that finds paying hospitals for each patient they treat, also known as activity-based funding, instead of allocating pre-defined annual budgets could improve the quantity and quality of health care services while reducing wait times for Canadians. Nearly every other developed country with a universal health-care system has moved towards activity-based funding in recent decades, whereas Canada is among the last to continue to use lump sum payments.

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