Taxes

— Feb 7, 2023
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Taxes, Innovation, and Productivity Growth

Taxes, Innovation, and Productivity Growth is a new study that highlights the negative effect that higher corporate and personal income taxes have on innovation. In particular, Canada’s tax system is uncompetitive compared to those of other advanced economies—including the United States—when it comes to encouraging innovation-related activities, which in turn slows productivity growth, a key driver of higher living standards.

— Jan 5, 2023
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Broken Promises: The Persistence of Elevated Personal and Corporate Income Taxes in Ontario

Broken Promises: The persistence of elevated personal and corporate income taxes in Ontario is a new study that finds due to both federal and provincial tax hikes, Ontario now has the third highest top combined federal/provincial or federal/ state top income tax rate in Canada or the United States—having jumped from 46.41 per cent in 2012 to 53.53 per cent.

— Nov 17, 2022
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Measuring the Fiscal Performance of Canada's Premiers, 2022

Measuring the Fiscal Performance of Canada's Premiers, 2022 is a new study that ranks Canadian premiers (seven current and four former) based on three fiscal policy categories: government spending, taxes, and deficits and debt up to the fiscal year 2021/22. Premiers who managed spending more prudently, balanced the budgets, and or paid down debt ranked higher.

— Nov 1, 2022
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British Columbia's Growing Tax Competitiveness Problem

BC's Tax Competitiveness Problem is Growing over Time is a new study that finds British Columbia now has the 4th highest top Personal Income Tax (PIT) rate in Canada or the United States at 53.5 per cent—only 1.3 per cent lower than Newfoundland and Labrador, the highest rated jurisdiction in both the US and Canada.

— Oct 27, 2022
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Measuring Progressivity in Canada’s Tax System, 2022

Measuring Progressivity in Canada’s Tax System, 2022 finds that the top 20 per cent of income-earning families pay more than half (53 per cent) of total taxes including sales and property taxes. Conversely, the bottom 20 per cent of income-earning families pay 0.8 per cent of total taxes, due partly to the progressivity of Canada’s tax system where the share of taxes paid typically increases as incomes rise.

— Sep 28, 2022
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Comparing Provincial Marginal Tax Rates for Middle-Income Earners Across Canada

Comparing Provincial Marginal Tax Rates for Middle Income Earners Across Canada finds that middle-income workers in Atlantic Canada pay much higher provincial personal income tax burdens than Western Canadians earning similar amounts. In fact, whereas Atlantic Canadian workers who earn the national average income ($52,750 in 2022) face provincial personal income tax burdens ranging from $4,463 in New Brunswick to $5,318 in Nova Scotia, workers in Western Canada earning the same amount pay provincial income tax burdens of between $2,353 in British Columbia and $3,914 in Saskatchewan.

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