Government Spending & Taxes

— Apr 6, 2022
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No Free Lunch for the 99 Percent: Estimating Revenue Effects from Taxes on Top Earners

No Free Lunch for the 99 Percent: Estimating Revenue Effects from Taxes on Top Earners finds that if the federal government, which plans to table its next budget this week, wants to fund a major expansion of government, it simply can’t raise enough tax revenue solely from Canada’s upper-income families.

— Mar 31, 2022
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Learning from Ontario’s Past

Learning from Ontario’s Past: How Ontario Can Avoid Another Post-Recession Debt Binge is a new study that focuses on how the provincial government could balance the budget by 2022/23, and what mistakes made by past governments should be avoided to ensure fiscal stability. Based on recent projections, the provincial government would need to reduce annual spending by $9.1 billion from its 2021/22 level to balance the budget in 2022/23—a 4.8 per cent decrease.

— Mar 24, 2022
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High Tax Rates on Top Earners in Atlantic Canada and Quebec

High Tax Rates on Top Earners in Atlantic Canada and Quebec is a new study that finds Atlantic Canada and Quebec have some of the highest personal income tax rates nationwide on individuals and households that earn $100,000 or more a year, but also have the lowest percentages of tax filers with over $100,000 of income. By comparison, Ontario and western Canadian provinces have lower tax rates on high-income earners, and also a higher share of tax filers that earn more than $100,000 annually.

— Mar 17, 2022
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The Size of Government in Canada in 2019

The Size of Government in Canada in 2019 is a new study that finds the size of government across Canada was on the rise even before the COVID-19 pandemic and recession. In fact, relative to the size of the provincial economies, the size of government increased in all but two provinces over the 2007 to 2019 period.

— Mar 1, 2022
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Ottawa’s Pattern of Excessive Spending and Persistent Deficits

Ottawa’s Pattern of Excessive Spending and Persistent Deficits is a new study that finds between 2015/16 and 2019/20, the federal government ran five consecutive deficits, causing the federal debt to rise by $112.2 billion—all prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, weakening federal finances as Canada headed into it.

— Feb 8, 2022
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Impact of Federal Income Tax Changes on Canadian Families in the Bottom 20 Percent of Earners, 2022

Impact of Federal Income Tax Changes on Canadian Families in the Bottom 20 Percent of Earners, 2022 finds that contrary to rhetoric from Ottawa, 60 per cent of taxpaying families with children in the bottom 20 per cent of income earners paid more federal personal income tax—$233 more on average compared with 2015.

— Jan 20, 2022
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Measuring the Impact of Federal Personal Income Tax Changes on Middle Income Canadian Families since 2015

Measuring the Impact of Federal Personal Income Tax Changes on Middle Income Canadian Families since 2015 finds that contrary to rhetoric from Ottawa, 86 per cent of middle-class families experienced an increase in their federal personal income tax burden of $800 annually (on average) since 2015.

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