Government Spending & Taxes

— Oct 26, 2021
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Fiscal Explosion: Federal Spending on Indigenous  Programs, 2015–2022

Fiscal Explosion: Federal Spending on Indigenous Programs, 2015-2022 finds that since 2015 federal spending on Indigenous programs has skyrocketed from $12.4 billion to $24 billion—or by 94.3 per cent.

— Oct 19, 2021
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Less Ottawa, More Province, 2021

Less Ottawa, More Province, 2021: How Decentralized Federalism is Key to Health Care Reform is a new study that examines two of the most important ongoing public policy challenges facing Canada: the deterioration of government finances, and the comparative underperformance of our health care system. Fundamental reform of Canada’s health care system can be achieved by replicating changes made by the Chretien government in the 1990s when Ottawa removed strings to federal funding for welfare, providing the provinces with more autonomy and flexibility.

— Oct 14, 2021
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Prime Ministers and Government Spending: Updated 2021 Edition

Prime Ministers and Government Spending, Updated 2021 Edition is a new study that analyzes program spending by prime minister since Confederation, and finds that in 2020/21, federal program spending is expected to reach a minimum of $13,032 (inflation adjusted), which is 34.8 per cent higher than in 2019, pre-COVID, and 42.4 per cent higher than the level of spending recorded during 2009, a pronounced global recession.

— Oct 7, 2021
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Does the Canada Child Benefit Actually Reduce Child Poverty?

Does the Canada Child Benefit (CCB) Actually Reduce Child Poverty? is a new study that finds the Canada Child Benefit is less effective than the government claims at lifting children out of poverty due to a lack of targeting. In fact, despite spending an additional $5.6 billion in 2019-20, the new Canada Child Benefit only moved an estimated 90,900 children above Statistics Canada’s Low-Income Cut-Off, a key measure of low-income.

— Sep 9, 2021
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The Lifetime Tax Burden for Canadians from Federal Debt Accumulation

Lifetime Tax Burden for Canadians from Federal Debt Accumulation finds that Canadians aged 16 to 35 will pay an additional $205.1 billion in personal income taxes (or 61.7 per cent of the total burden imposed on all age groups) over their lifetimes due to additional federal debt accumulation.

— Aug 26, 2021
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Education Spending in Public Schools in Canada, Fall 2021

Education Spending in Public Schools in Canada, Fall 2021 finds from 2014/15 to 2018/19 per-student education spending increased across Canada, with compensation (salaries, benefits and pensions) accounting for most of the growth in spending.

— Aug 13, 2021
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Taxes versus the Necessities of Life: The Canadian Consumer Tax Index 2021 edition

The Canadian Consumer Tax Index, 2021 Edition is a new study that finds even with a substantial COVID-driven reduction in tax revenue, the average Canadian family still spent over 36 per cent of its income on taxes in 2020 compared to 35.4 per cent on basic necessities—more than housing, food and clothing costs combined. Since 1961, the average Canadian family’s total tax bill has increased nominally by 1,992 per cent, eclipsing increases in annual housing costs (1,671 per cent), clothing (629 per cent) and food (767 per cent).

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